Secret Faults


Psalm 19:12 Who can discern his errors? Cleanse me from secret faults.

Secret faults are hidden stress areas. As the earth has hidden fault lines, when stress occurs the earth opens up and does damage to the immediate and surrounding areas.

Thoughts. Random thoughts that we entertain we eventually accept. We like them. We are curious about them. Then we forget about them.

But does our body forget about them?

Thoughts become words.
Words become vows or binding contracts or agreements.
Vows become conversations (the idea is to get someone else to also sign the contract)
Conversations become actions.
Actions set in motion behavior.
Behavior brings forth fruit.

Fruit, whether good or bad, is a result of the thoughts sown into the soil of our heart and mind. We may have stopped behaving certain ways but once it has found its way out into the body, we often just take care of the manifestion of the secret fault, not the secret fault (random, idle thoughts)

Psalm 50:23 He who offers a sacrifice of thanksgiving honors Me;
And to him who sets his way properly
I will show the salvation of God.” (NASB)

Whoever offers praise glorifies Me;
And to him who orders his conduct aright
I will show the salvation of God.” (NKJV)

Whoso offereth praise glorifieth me:
and to him that ordereth his conversation aright
will I shew the salvation of God.

“Sets his way properly”
“Orders his conduct aright”
“Ordereth his conversation aright”

Hebrew word here is “derek” and means “A course of life by way of conversation”

2 Cor 10:5 We are destroying arguments and all arrogance raised against the knowledge of God, and we are taking every thought captive to the obedience of Christ.

Every thought that is not taken captive to the obedience of Christ, becomes a word, which becomes a conversation.

The Stress Response
The stress response begins in the brain (see illustration). When someone confronts an oncoming car or other danger, the eyes or ears (or both) send the information to the amygdala, an area of the brain that contributes to emotional processing. The amygdala interprets the images and sounds. When it perceives danger, it instantly sends a distress signal to the hypothalamus.

Command center
illustration of brain showing areas activated by stress When someone experiences a stressful event, the amygdala, an area of the brain that contributes to emotional processing, sends a distress signal to the hypothalamus. This area of the brain functions like a command center, communicating with the rest of the body through the nervous system so that the person has the energy to fight or flee.
From Harvard Health Publishing

The hypothalamus is a bit like a command center. This area of the brain communicates with the rest of the body through the autonomic nervous system, which controls such involuntary body functions as breathing, blood pressure, heartbeat, and the dilation or constriction of key blood vessels and small airways in the lungs called bronchioles. The autonomic nervous system has two components, the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system functions like a gas pedal in a car. It triggers the fight-or-flight response, providing the body with a burst of energy so that it can respond to perceived dangers. The parasympathetic nervous system acts like a brake. It promotes the “rest and digest” response that calms the body down after the danger has passed.

After the amygdala sends a distress signal, the hypothalamus activates the sympathetic nervous system by sending signals through the autonomic nerves to the adrenal glands. These glands respond by pumping the hormone epinephrine (also known as adrenaline) into the bloodstream. As epinephrine circulates through the body, it brings on a number of physiological changes. The heart beats faster than normal, pushing blood to the muscles, heart, and other vital organs. Pulse rate and blood pressure go up. The person undergoing these changes also starts to breathe more rapidly. Small airways in the lungs open wide. This way, the lungs can take in as much oxygen as possible with each breath. Extra oxygen is sent to the brain, increasing alertness. Sight, hearing, and other senses become sharper. Meanwhile, epinephrine triggers the release of blood sugar (glucose) and fats from temporary storage sites in the body. These nutrients flood into the bloodstream, supplying energy to all parts of the body.

All of these changes happen so quickly that people aren’t aware of them. In fact, the wiring is so efficient that the amygdala and hypothalamus start this cascade even before the brain’s visual centers have had a chance to fully process what is happening. That’s why people are able to jump out of the path of an oncoming car even before they think about what they are doing.

As the initial surge of epinephrine subsides, the hypothalamus activates the second component of the stress response system — known as the HPA axis. This network consists of the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland, and the adrenal glands.

The HPA axis relies on a series of hormonal signals to keep the sympathetic nervous system — the “gas pedal” — pressed down. If the brain continues to perceive something as dangerous, the hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which travels to the pituitary gland, triggering the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). This hormone travels to the adrenal glands, prompting them to release cortisol. The body thus stays revved up and on high alert. When the threat passes, cortisol levels fall. The parasympathetic nervous system — the “brake” — then dampens the stress response.

************

All the above is from Harvard Health Publishing.

The stress response begins in the brain.
Paul says he takes every thought captive.

I have been repenting of secret faults, random thoughts that had been buried long ago that still wreak havoc in my body.

We don’t take this seriously enough.




Published by darlenerose

Master Herbalist, Health & Wellness Consultant, Author and lover of my Creator.

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